Category Archives: fear of dying

Death & Dying, Loss & Grief Brought to You by THE DEATH CHICKS

The Death Chicks? Are you kidding me? How outrageous and fun, melding the disparate concepts, “Death” and “Chicks” into a weekly show on Google Hangouts On Air (HOA).

Thanks to the internet, two professionals working in the death industry, Patty Burgess/Philadelphia connected with Myste Lyn/ Canada. Getting acquainted through Skype, they discovered they were “on the same wave length,” and shared a similar sense of humor. Their conversations were always punctuated with laughter, a key element to releasing endorphins in the brains. As they explored the spectrum of end of life issues to discuss in a weekly show, they knew laughter was a key component, because it puts people at ease, and lessens their fears. Patty said: “Our individual hospice training and personal coaching perspectives created our basic philosophy: you can’t enjoy life to the fullest unless you stop being afraid of dying.” Continue reading

Learn How To…Talk To Your Doctor…and never hear the ugly words ‘Death Panels’ again!

Just in case you forgot how “Death Panels” became The LIE of the YEAR in 2009, click on this link, http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2014/dec/15/look-back-politifacts-lie-year/   — skip down to the “PolitiFacts LIE of the year for 2009.

How many people died in the past six years, without the benefit of an “end of life” conversation with their physician(s)? Is this on Sarah Palin’s conscience? Continue reading

How The Mesothelioma Center Can Help Someone With A Terminal Diagnosis of Mesothelioma  

The value of a good support team can’t be understated when facing a terminal diagnosis. A network of supportive family, friends and health care professionals is the greatest asset someone can have when coping with a terminal disease like mesothelioma cancer.

Mesothelioma is an incurable cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. The five-year survival rate is less than 10 percent, and mesothelioma life expectancy is between 12 to 21 months. However, advancements in treatment are helping people live longer and more comfortably with the disease, and rare cases do go into remission, but the vast majority diagnosed with mesothelioma will succumb to the cancer within three years. Continue reading

What if my Plan A–whole body donation–is scrubbed?

    “Go directly to Plan B—find the cheapest cremation!”   

Last month I discussed my 2009 decision to donate my body to www.medcure.org when I was a five-year breast cancer survivor. Since my type of cancer, lobular invasive, often shows up in the other (contralateral) breast, I was obsessed about a recurrence, which could lead to metastatic cancer– catch my drift? Reliving the horror of my modified radical mastectomy, chemo and radiation, threw me into a year of medical research. My oncologist and surgeon agreed with the ten reasons I discovered to justify a prophylactic mastectomy. The surgeon said, “I’ll give you a 100% guarantee that you’ll never have breast cancer on your right side.” By God’s grace, fabulous medical care, and healthy living I’m still alive. Will medical researchers still want my mutilated body when I die? Continue reading

I’ll Never Stop Volunteering! Need a body for medical research? Take mine!

Last year I explained that my God-given soul returns to Him, eternally, when I die, in my Blog post, My Life in Three Ice Cubes: …Whenever Death comes, as you can see, the third ice-cube (my corpse) will be a mere puddle, like the cocoon abandoned by the butterfly, or the shell discarded by a cicada.

I’ve heard other survivors declare that “Cancer is the gift that keeps on giving,” because late stage effects extend our suffering. I say organ or whole body donation is the only gift that can keep on giving. If I can’t use my body anymore, why shouldn’t someone else benefit from it? Continue reading

The Longest Running Guilt–Remorse–or REGRET?

In 1966, I was working in Washington, D.C. when I got the news that my dad was diagnosed with prostate cancer, age fifty-seven. I called his doctor in Ohio. He emphatically said: “He’s got about five years IF he follows directions.”

Not once during those five long years did we ever ask:

  • Had the doctor counseled him?
  • What was he worried about?
  • How could we help him?
  • How did he feel about dying?
  • Was there anything he wanted to say to us before he died?
  • What kind of funeral did he want?
  • How would we cope when he was gone?

Continue reading

TUG of WAR

Tug-of-War-about-YOU

Click image to enlarge

I hope this Mind Map is legible! I am trying to show, with a few pictures, what can happen to a person who is terminally ill. The patient has had enough: “NO MORE TREATMENT. Just let me die, at home, with my family, in a calm atmosphere. Keep those Hospice folks busy–tell them I just hate pain, don’t interfere with my medications–it’s too late for me to get addicted to pain killers. Talk to me about my life, our life, and share with me how you feel about my dying. And let me talk about my feelings too. Death is inevitable, now it’s my time to go. Give me permission. Tell me you will see me later, when we meet again in Heaven. Kiss me goodbye.”

My Life in Three Ice Cubes

Are these familiar Bible verses? “In the beginning, GOD created the heavens and the earth…” HE was lonely, and created a man and a woman. In Jeremiah 1:5, HE said: “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you; before you were born I set you apart…” My interpretation? God knows me, loves me, and gave me my Soul.

ice cubes

These three ice cubes demonstrate how I visualize my life process and the concept of “SOUL.” The first ice cube represents my Birth; at Midlife, the second ice cube has partially melted signifying my life’s half over. When Death comes, the third ice cube will have dissolved into a puddle and released my SOUL. Here’s my evidence: Continue reading